My Epic: Behold, Album Review

my-epic-behold

The Metalcore label, Facedown, has a found a real gem with My Epic, and they’re not even a hardcore band.  I discovered this band through the Christian music website, Indie Vision, and with a sale on Facedown records for $2.99, I took a chance and bought it. What I found is easily one of the best worship albums I have heard in a very long time.

My Epic are a fairly unknown indie band that mixes beautiful atmospheres with sometimes hard hitting guitar distortion, yet even though the music can sometimes be heavy, it never loses its beauty. Lead singer Aaron Stone has a soft, gentle voice that can be an acquired taste for some, but it gets the job done more than sufficiently. The music itself is unlike anything I’ve heard from any worship artist (the only comparisons I can draw from it are probably Ascend the Hill and the Ember Days). It has a celestial quality to it that, from the first song, seems to take you straight to the throne room. It feels drenched with anointing, and that’s not just a way of saying it’s good.

But a warning to those who have never heard of the band, they are very difficult to get into. Where most worship artists give you songs you love off the bat, My Epic gives you songs that you need to dig into in order to appreciate and fall in love with. Behold is an album that requires patience, since most of the songs don’t have a chorus, and may seem to drag on for eternity. For myself, I see that as a massive high point to the album, as every song strays from the typical song structure of a verse, chorus, and bridge. A perfect example of this is the song Hail. It’s a song filled with awe and trembling as Aaron sings  Your words destroying everything; the earth collapses under me. How could I stand against Your voice?
Empty throat, all I make is noise. And eventually responds to the chorus of majesty.

To point highlights would take all day, since there isn’t a song I don’t love. The worship that these guys give is pure and unadulterated. Confession is a good example of this. A song that talks about seeking treasures in the world, when they are nothing. The chorus (one of the only songs, along with Curse, that has a chorus) says, and in the end may l die as the thief my greatest joy that You’d hang there with me
blessed further still if my flesh could be made an object of grace
to walk behind, to die beside, then wake to find my Lord, my love in paradise.

Lyrically my absolute favourite is Curse. It tackles the belief so many Christians have that if they were alive when the Lord was being crucified, they would weep and cry along, when in reality, we’re putting Him on the cross and feeling nothing. At the heart, it’s about pride, and Aaron hits you in the gut with the words You are not a corpse and we’re not a movement You’re alive and we’re the flesh You’ll wear till the worlds end. We think we can make a change, yet it’s only God in us that provokes the change in others.

Royal is the heaviest song on the record, and again it is filled with such an awe of the glory and character of Christ that brings you to your knees. And even though Christ is incredible, He still loves us and shows us grace.

While I could go on about each song, if there’s one song you must hear, it’s easily Zion. I can honestly say that this is one of the most beautiful worship songs in existence right now (not counting hymns of course). It is filled with such a longing for our savior that rings out to the listener and makes him/her cry out in worship, which is exactly what I did. Take a listen:

The album ends with Arrive. The final bookend of the record that joins hand in hand with the trilogy of songs that is the backbone of the whole record: Arise, Approach, and Arrive. Easily the most musically grand and exciting and ends the album on a joyful and victorious note.

Overall, I can not speak highly enough about this album. It’s all at once beautiful, heavy, intimate, and just anointed. It’s the first album ever where I would finish playing it through and would want to play through it again. It’s that good. My advice, if you have other worship albums on your to buy list, put this on the top if you haven’t already got it. My Epic is epic indeed.

5/5

 

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6 thoughts on “My Epic: Behold, Album Review

  1. Giving it a spin right now. I’m liking the post-rock influences. Very tasty so far. I’d liken them to Smashing Pumpkins and This Will Destroy You, but Christian lyrics.

    1. Yep, these guys are really good, especially with the lyrics. When you read the lyrics along with the music, it’s powerful stuff.

  2. Holy smokes, you actually take a band 5/5. I’m shaking in my boots, I’m am definitely interested. I’m going to give them a listen. Because from the sounds of things, they worship more than most bands do. If I so end up liking them. I’m going to plan a day to come to over and blast that music. God bless.

    1. Haha, yes I did. For me, a five is only reserved for those albums that are, in my opinion, timeless and perfect. In my collection I’ve only got probably four or five I’ll give five stars to. This is one of them.

  3. Nice review man, it’s really hard (for me) to find a balance between describing the album itself and describing how I feel about it, and you definitely did a great job of that! I haven’t grown to love Behold yet, but like you say it’s not easy to get into and I’ve hardly scratched the surface yet. God bless!

    1. Thanks Christian. I have that same problem of balancing my feelings to the music itself when writing a review, so I’m relieved I managed to pull that off! And like yourself, Behold didn’t catch me on first listen either. It’s a grower, especially for the style it’s in, but once it clicks, it’s simply amazing.
      God bless, and thanks for reading!

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