Bible Contradiction: Is It Ok To Curse People?

Paul instructs us in Romans to bless others rather than curse them. But is this in opposition with his instruction to the Galatians and Corinthians?

Bless them which persecute you: bless, and curse not. (Romans 12:14)

Paul tells his audience that we are to bless those who come against us rather than curse them. This is set against verses in which Paul seems to allow the act of cursing (1 Corinthians 16:22 and Galatians 1:8-9). This claim can be dispelled with quite easily. The Greek word used for curse here in Romans is katarasthe and is used elsewhere as an appeal to damnation, such as Jesus’s curse towards the fig tree in Mark 11:12. However, the word for curse used in 1 Corinthians and Galatians is anathema, which is a form of religious excommunication and does not reflect the type of cursing Paul prohibits in Romans.

Based on the functions of Biblical love (aka agape love. See the link below), Paul’s command fits right at home. Although we are called to love those who come against us, we are also warned not to be close or show any kind of sentimentality towards these kinds of people, for what fellowship has light with darkness? If someone plans to disrupt the body of Christ or lead individuals into sin the only right thing to do is remove them from any sort of communion with God’s sheep. All too often I’ve seen Christian love used as a guilt trip to turn believers into mats to walk on and take advantage of. If you stand for yourself and what is right and learn to say “No” to people who encourage you to partake in things that could potentially be to your detriment words like “unchristlike” or “unchristian” often come into play. Instructions like the one in Romans are haphazardly interpreted in order to justify such abhorrent behaviour but the truth is it’s simply unbiblical.

In the end, critics who hold to this contradictory interpretation simply don’t understand the type of curse Paul is prohibiting.

Link: What is the Love of God?

Advertisements